UPDATED: CFA and CSU have reached agreement; strike postponed

The California Faculty Association Board of Directors and the California State University agreed earlier Friday to terms to postpone the strike which, if approved, would amount to a nearly 11 percent general salary increase over the next two fiscal years.

“The Bargaining Team has recommended that a tentative agreement between CFA and CSU management be submitted to the membership for ratification,” said a statement on the CFA’s website.

They announced that a 5 percent salary increase will go into place June 30 of this year for all faculty both active and on leave, the CFA’s website said.

In addition, the CFA’s website stated a 2 percent salary increase will go into effect July 1 of this year, and another 3.5 percent salary increase will take effect July 1 of next year for both active and on leave professors.

This deal came on the second day of the blackout period, where both sides were hoping to reach an agreement one last time before the strike, as previously reported by Xpress. During this time, neither side was allowed to be in communication, prepare or talk with the media about the strike.

The strike was set for April 13-15 and 18-19 and demanded a 5 percent general salary increase for all faculty members.

1 Comment on "UPDATED: CFA and CSU have reached agreement; strike postponed"

  1. Teddy Edwards | April 10, 2016 at 3:18 pm |

    They work a few months out of the year — some of them have graduate students teach their classes — the average adjunct (part-time) professor makes at least $55,000 — and college tuition keeps rising to pay for it.

    Student debt is over $1 trillion.

    If you see a student advocating for higher pay for the professors here, you can bet one or both of two things is true:

    (1) He or she has wealthy parents and he does not care about the size of his tuition.

    (2) He or she has little regard for the poor and middle-class students who have parents working 2-3 jobs to pay for the rising tuition for their college education which, in the end, is likely to be a sub-prime one (especially if they major in women’s studies, ethnic studies, cinema deconstruction, or whatever the non-income-producing fad of the day is).

Comments are closed.