Undocumented Students in the Trump Era

What Will Happen to Undocumented Students in the Trump Era?

The republican candidate to the White House and now President-elect, Donald Trump, promised to build a wall to keep immigrants from entering the country, to deport people who do not have papers and to make “America Great Again,” blaming the economical and social misfortunes of the country on immigrants–those who look, think and live differently.

Trump’s discriminatory words hit home and have socially and emotionally affected students at SF State who are undocumented.

In an effort to reassure more than 500 students at SF State that they can keep studying without fearing to be deported while at school, the student organization Improving Dreams Equity, Access and Success has brought up the importance of declaring the University a sanctuary. Becoming a sanctuary means the University will refrain from collaborating with Immigrants and Customs Enforcement and will not let them enter the campus where students are supposed to be worried about their academics, and not about being deported.

Undocumented students at SF State want to graduate and move to work in their chosen career fields. Like most college students, undocumented students struggle financially while trying to reach those goals.

The Consideration of Action for Deferred Childhood Arrival is an American immigration policy that started in 2012 under the Obama administration, which allows undocumented immigrants to access a two-year work permit (subject to renewal) and defer them from deportation, according to the Homeland Security website.

This permit, however, may no longer be available under Trump’s presidency as he has promised to terminate DACA, and students wanting to apply for it have been advised not to.

Golden Gate Xpress spoke with three students who are undocumented at SF State and asked them about their thoughts on being undocumented, going to college and deportation.

 

Pamela Ortiz

1) Pamela Ortiz On Applying to College:

2) Pamela Ortiz On Having and Losing DACA:

3) Pamela Ortiz On Possible Deportation:

4) Pamela Ortiz Thoughts on Trump:

 

Alejandro Garcia 

1). Alejandro Garcia On Applying to College:

2) Alejandro Garcia On Having and Losing DACA:

3) Alejandro Garcia On Possible Deportation:

4) Alejandro Garcia Thoughts on Trump:

 

Carlos Torres

1). Carlos Torres On a Dream Center:

2) Carlos Torres On Being Undocumented:

3) Carlos Torres On Possible Deportation:

4) Carlos Torres On protests against Trump:

 

Pamela Ortiz and Alejandro Garcia are  co-presidents of IDEAS, an organization that hosted a de-stress event on Nov. 8 for undocumented students and allies to support one another amidst the results of the elections. IDEAS has also spoken to the academic senate regarding their concerns about undocumented students’ safety on campus. They have also discussed the safety of muslims students regarding the proposed muslim registry that would be implemented under Trump’s presidency.

Carlos Torres is a student at SF State who  has recently felt more open about talking about his legal status after learning more about his rights and the resources available to him on campus.

IDEAS met with President Leslie E. Wong and Vice President Luoluo Hong on Dec. 14 to talk about a Dream Center where undocumented students can find resources and answers to their concerns. Ortiz said there may be a place on campus, starting next semester, that will become the Dream Center at SF State.

In California, 47 percent of immigrants are naturalized U.S. citizens, 26 percent have green cards or visas and 27 percent are undocumented, according to the Public Policy Institute of California.