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Eye popping play premiers

December 13, 2017

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Eye popping play premiers

From twerking, Trump and penises to the gender swapped roles, Lysistrata, the musical of the season at SF State, stepped forward to make a statement on stage.

Based on an ancient story based around a myth, this musical told the story with a modern twist on a rendition written for the modern audience.

The musical was able to use it voice to make statements, but the most prominent being about the gender roles in this ancient time.

Nick Christman who played Kleonike a female character in the play was happy to take part in the production.

“A women can do anything a man can do. Actually its deeper than that” he said. “The show is trying to show that anyone no matter what you identity as, you can make change happen.”

Christman was just one of the many character to play a role of another sex, an intentional commentary on the universal tale.

The show comments on many of the present issue that are being spoken about in media right now, including President Trump. One character in particular, the commissioner, seemed to be a caricature of the current president. Many of the mannerisms and sayings were derivative of the president but the character came to compromise in the end allowing for a separation in the symbol from the character.

The director Laura Wayth defined the show in its new rendition on stage pointing out the important connections to the present.

“We hope that you watch this and recognize how little human nature has changed since 411 B.C.E.,” she said. “Our problems, our desires, our politicians, and our basic human nature remain the same.”

While the show was directed towards the modern audiences most of the audience was excited by the ancient stories rendition.

Nicole Green, and undeclared student at SF State, came for a class assignment but said she would see the show again.

“I like that they took this ancient thing and made it modern, it was entertaining,” she said. “they really tackled some issues.”

John Neblett, 54, a theater arts major has been in the theater world for about two years now, finding his passion to perform in prison he is now graduating, glad to have been able to perform3 in the production.

“San Francisco State does justice to the art of drama. We put on the best $20 live shows in town,” he said. “Our shows connections to modern day issues, it shows that those issues haven’t been resolved. Presenting it as entertainment is perhaps the most gentle way for society to begin the discussion.”