ASI election results are in despite low voter turnout

After an extended voting period that dipped into Spring Break, election results are in for the next leaders of Associated Students, Inc.

The official winners met Monday to discuss the next steps before they begin their terms May 1. The incoming student officers will go on a retreat the weekend of April 13 where they will establish the goals and objectives they hope to accomplish over the next year.

Incoming ASI President Adenike Hamilton aims to ensure that students’ fees are spent in the most efficient way possible.

“I ran because I saw a need for more cooperation between the two student auxiliaries, Associated Students, Inc. as well as the Cesar Chavez Student Center,” Hamilton said. “Both of those have separate student fees. I feel like there’s a disparity in how those fees are spent. I believe that if they are both student fees they should work more collaboratively and get things done.”

The voting period was extended after an error came to the attention of Horace Montgomery, ASI director of programs and services, that undeclared students were not being allowed to vote in the elections. The online ballot was restricting 1,400 undeclared students from voting due to a University error.

The error was discovered three days into the voting period and was fixed by the next day, so ASI decided to extend the elections an additional three days to give those students the same amount of time to vote, according to Montgomery.

“We don’t want anyone to think they have been disenfranchised,” Montgomery said.

SF State also sent out an email notifying students that the issue had been resolved and that they were still eligible to vote.

“It actually worked in our favor because it served as a reminder to students to vote,” Montgomery said. We got a larger turnout than we have ever had on that Friday (after the email was sent).”

Only 6 percent, or 1,670 SF State students voted in the elections that were extended an additional three days, according to Montgomery.

There were about 100 voters who voted over Spring Break as well, according to Montgomery.

“In my opinion they did a stellar job considering they couldn’t campaign at all,” Montgomery said. “The rain that entire week prevented the campaign.”

Students and organizations campaigned in past years in the quad to encourage voting, an activity that was hindered by the rainy weather this year.

The University typically doesn’t send out a lot of emails to students to ensure they don’t feel like they are being spammed. Only in the last few years has the University sent out emails to students before ASI elections, according to Montgomery. ASI doesn’t have access to all the email addresses for students, so they are unable to notify students about elections on their own.

There are currently three vacant positions: freshman representative, ethnic studies representative and education representative, which will be appointed by the new board when their term begins. Some of the issues the new board of directors hope to address include funding for student organizations, according to Sunny Pak, the incoming VP of Internal Affairs.

Kris Domingo, vice president of finance, decided to run because of his experience working with ASI, and serving a similar role as the current assistant coordinator for the student-led organization Pilipino American Collegiate Endeavor.

“I’ve dealt with ASI in terms of funding proposals and my own organization when it comes to budgeting for events,” he said. “I understand how hard it can be to scramble for funds.”

The incoming ASI officers will be inaugurated April 30 at 5 p.m. in Jack Adams Hall.

 

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