Video of Student Center confrontation fuels cultural appropriation controversy

Cory Goldstein (left) and Bonita Tindle (right) shown in a video posted on YouTube Monday, Mar. 28. (Nicholas Silvera via YouTube)

A confrontation between two SF State students caught on video in the Cesar Chavez Student Center went viral Monday. The argument centered around whether a white person wearing dreadlocks constitutes cultural appropriation.

Around 4 p.m. in the SF State Student Center, Associated Students, Inc. intern and photography major Bonita Tindle allegedly assaulted environmental science major Cory Goldstein because of his hairstyle and race, according to a report by the SF State University Police Department.

Tindle followed him down two flights of stairs and threatened to cut his hair off with scissors, according to Goldstein.

:

“Someone within an activist group thought that she could attack me based on my locs and that’s not okay – it’s not even a part of the colored community’s culture,” Goldstein said. “I felt that I didn’t

need to explain myself. My hair, my rules, my body.”

Maddy Grey, a communications major at SF State, said she witnessed the incident and the video was taken halfway through the exchange. Grey posted about what led up to the recorded incident to her Facebook account on Tuesday, saying, “He called her a bitch after she tried to give him a flyer so she went to talk to him about his dreads and not to call her a bitch (naturally).”

Goldstein said this was the first time anyone had expressed negative views about his hairstyle and he sees dreadlocks as not solely the domain of Rastafarian or African culture.

The video, titled “SFSU 2016 – Campus employee assaults white student for ‘cultural appropriation’” had more than 260,000 views on YouTube at press time and was trending on Facebook Tuesday afternoon.

Jonathan Morales, director of news and new media at SF State, said Tindle is not employed by SF State and that the University and ASI have separate contacts and a separate board of directors.

“We are taking the matter seriously and will promptly and thoroughly investigate this incident through applicable University channels, including our campus student conduct procedures,” Morales said in a statement issued Tuesday.

“I do see it as cultural appropriation,” said Taylor Hunter, a psychology major who identifies as African American. “We are all so culturally intertwined this day and age, we are always borrowing from different cultures. But you need to know where you got it from and you need to be respectful of the people that created it for you.”

“For me, I don’t care if someone has dreads or has straight hair: I think everyone has freedom to do whatever they want,” said philosophy major Asha Hassan. “There is nothing wrong with him having dreads. I feel like she was in the wrong because you can’t tell someone how to live their lives or what to do to their hair.”

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Goldstein declined to press charges, although he said the campus police considered the incident battery and a hate crime.

“I really am hoping that the campus is able to fully resolve this issue without any more issues basically,” Goldstein said. “I don’t feel that me getting attacked should cause more of an attack.”

ASI President Phoebe Dye declined to comment.

Xpress was unable to reach Bonita Tindle for comment as of the posting of this article.

UPDATE: The video interview of Cory Goldstein was updated with a new video that corrected the error where part of the audio cut out. The new video features the audio that was previously muted.

UPDATE: The Golden Gate Xpress has been trying to reach out to Bonita Tindle since the video went viral on Tuesday. We are actively seeking communication with her and look forward to interviewing her and learning her side of the story.

120 Comments on "Video of Student Center confrontation fuels cultural appropriation controversy"

  1. Shelly Clark | March 29, 2016 at 9:35 pm |

    Super interesting article and video; thanks for posting!

  2. Colored People?? That dude is an idiot. He can wear dreads all he want’s but there is a history of black culture being trodden upon in this nation and he is entirely insensitive to it. While it’s arguable whether or not he should don dreads, he definitely has a race problem with his use of the word colored and his insensitivity, after the fact, to black trauma.

    • You know, the thing is, he didn’t experience any black trauma, because he isn’t black. Therefore, he is not going to comment on it because that wasn’t the question being asked. He isn’t being insensitive, he’s telling his side of the story. Does he need to defend black people after he was bullied by one? No, he doesn’t need to do anything. Not sure what you’re trying to get out of him, but he doesn’t owe you anything. He was just minding his own business and now you want to pick on his choice of words. Why not pick on HER choice of words? Is she never going to be held accountable because he’s white?

      • Dare I say he won’t get justice because he’s white and dare I say with how college campuses are going also partially as he is jewish.

      • Tyler Primas | March 30, 2016 at 6:55 am |

        Yes the girl should be held accountable for her actions and it would’ve been completed it she was also interviewed, and no she shouldn’t have put her hands on him because, frankly, who gives a fuck what kind of hair he is wearing? The only issue that comes up is the fact that he called us the “colored” community. That’s just not politically correct when there are other terms he could’ve used.. (the black community, the african american community, etc. etc). It’s completely insensitive and it throws off every argument he had after that.

        • Are non-white people not also called “people of color”? It seems you’re really reading into one word unnecessarily.

          • Tyler Primas | April 1, 2016 at 1:56 pm |

            The word “colored” is derogatory. Civil rights day, when segregation was a thing, and restrooms, movies theaters, any kind of public facilities were labeled “colored”. It’s not exactly a term on endearment.

          • Ribb Rotgut | April 2, 2016 at 5:32 am |

            NAACP

          • charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 4:58 pm |

            White isn’t a term of endearment either-it is just loosely descriptive. I am actually not caucasian at all- I have no ties to the caucuses- a race of people that actually look quite different than Nordic people like myself. Of course to even say Nordic in this country is risky- why don’t you tell me about my privilege again? It is not getting boring at all-

        • oaksavanna | March 30, 2016 at 6:12 pm |

          So it’s okay she assaulted him because he used the wrong word. He’s in the wrong now not her because he used the wrong word.

          • Tyler Primas | April 1, 2016 at 1:57 pm |

            I never said it was okay for her to assault him. Both of them are in the wrong for two different things.

        • Elrod Jones | March 30, 2016 at 9:59 pm |

          I’m reposting what I just posted above:

          the outrage over semantics is truly insane in the…. I don’t even know what community I should refer to it as to placate you Angel of Sunrise. I’ve heard people get mad about being called “black” and demand to be called African-American. I’ve heard people get mad about being called “African-American” and demand to be called black (“I don’t have any ties to Africa. Why do you have to qualify what kind of “American” I am? You don’t call yourself a “white-American?”). The phrase “people of color” gets thrown around all the time, but reverse the order and call someone “colored” and you’re now going to throw a fit? As someone else points out, the “C” in the NAACP stands for “colored.” Are you “annoyed” at the NAACP?

          I get that the black community has a lot of justified anger. I get why people are offended by the use of the “N-word.” Why people feel our mass incarceration system is racist. Cops seem to be shooting unarmed black kids and getting away with it left and right. But you have to pick your battles sometimes. Lashing out at people who would otherwise be allies about dumb stuff like dreadlocks and adjective word order is not going to serve you in the long run and will alienate more people from your cause.

          Yes, some would construe this as “tone policing.” But I’d just call it being rational. If everything is an outrage, then nothing is. Save the outrage for the stuff that really matters.

        • No it doesn’t. You’re just looking for something to,complain about

        • emyrtlemartin | March 31, 2016 at 7:36 pm |

          that’s called “carrying a chip on your shoulder” sister.

    • David Johnson | March 30, 2016 at 12:57 am |

      Saying “colored community” doesn’t necessarily mean he is insensitive. You can’t take one word out of context and pretend you know who he is. You can say there is a word you prefer. But this kind of overgeneralization is a product of your own prejudice. People are not their color.

      • iamcuriousblue | March 30, 2016 at 8:44 am |

        Very true. In actuality, the term “communities of color” is a current, very PC term. Change the word order and a few syllables and its suddenly some HUGE racist insult.

        In other words, the above use of words isn’t really about racism, it’s about an arbitrary shibboleth that’s supposed to signal whether or not you’re part of the political in-group or not.

        • The_Angel_of_Sunrise | March 30, 2016 at 1:45 pm |

          Why is it so hard for white people to understand. The term “colored” was coined during the Jim Crow era… The HEIGHT of racism…. So yea it is annoying to hear..

          • You know, many words start out meaning one thing but evolve as time goes on. For example : gay. Once upon a time it meant happy. Now it means homosexual.

            Also, as someone else said, somehow changing adjective order makes it offensive? “people of color” Vs “colored people” are the same words and mean the same.

            By the way, the guy in the video may have just been nervous and didn’t want to say something like “oh, those black people” and ended up jumbling together words. It’s so damn easy to be offended.

          • Robert K. McClain | March 30, 2016 at 7:31 pm |

            NAACP

          • Mugsy DaPoodle | March 30, 2016 at 9:43 pm |

            Hi Angel! I’m a Poodle. And I know that “colored” was in use before1860… well before Jim Crow laws. Are you aware that “Colored” is used by the NAACP? Indeed, the “C” in the name stands for “Colored”. Now you know. Mugsy on your side! Poodle Power!

          • Joel Holmes | March 31, 2016 at 7:17 pm |

            And “Corded Poodles” used to wear their “hair” (really, fur) in a style similar to modern “Dreadlocks.”

          • Elrod Jones | March 30, 2016 at 9:57 pm |

            the outrage over semantics is truly insane in the…. I don’t even know what community I should refer to it as to placate you Angel of Sunrise. I’ve heard people get mad about being called “black” and demand to be called African-American. I’ve heard people get mad about being called “African-American” and demand to be called black (“I don’t have any ties to Africa. Why do you have to qualify what kind of “American” I am? You don’t call yourself a “white-American?”). The phrase “people of color” gets thrown around all the time, but reverse the order and call someone “colored” and you’re now going to throw a fit? As someone else points out, the “C” in the NAACP stands for “colored.” Are you “annoyed” at the NAACP?

            I get that the black community has a lot of justified anger. I get why people are offended by the use of the “N-word.” Why people feel our mass incarceration system is racist. Cops seem to be shooting unarmed black kids and getting away with it left and right. But you have to pick your battles sometimes. Lashing out at people who would otherwise be allies about dumb stuff like dreadlocks and adjective word order is not going to serve you in the long run and will alienate more people from your cause.

            Yes, some would construe this as “tone policing.” But I’d just call it being rational. If everything is an outrage, then nothing is. Save the outrage for the stuff that really matters.

          • Dan Waterhouse | March 31, 2016 at 5:52 am |

            Black people need not claim they’re so oppressed because their community has been failing for decades. They need to look at themselves before blaming white people. Single parent homes, black-on-black crime, a culture that does not value education as demonstrated by piss-poor enrollment numbers come to mind.

          • Gringosteria | April 1, 2016 at 11:33 am |

            “Lashing out at people who would otherwise be allies about dumb stuff like dreadlocks and adjective word order is not going to serve you in the long run and will alienate more people from your cause.”

            I see white people post stuff like this all the time. What makes you think POC want white allies? Personally, I don’t want gringo allies cause as being demonstrated on here, you guys can’t be trusted. You will sell us out first chance you get.

          • Gringosteria | April 21, 2016 at 5:00 pm |

            Pity? When did I ask for that? LOL. Gringos are so weird.

          • charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 6:42 pm |

            Oh so do I have the people of color community’s stamp of approval to have an opinion? Nice. Tell me about my privilege again? Why would you want to race mix though when you hold white people in such disdain? Why is it good for humanity? Why would I comment on anyone’s relationship and not consider it a private matter for the individuals within the relationship to decide? Do you find arrogance an attractive or even wise quality to have? You certainly display it.

          • just stfu would ya?

          • charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 4:50 pm |

            Why is it so hard for POJ to understand that getting offended is something that happens during life? Reacting like a fragile head case does nothing to promote your well being

    • Sigmund Fraud | March 30, 2016 at 6:18 pm |

      Son, you are suffering from the black trauma. You need to seek medical attention.

    • Robert K. McClain | March 30, 2016 at 7:31 pm |

      You’re so offended by “Colored People” So what does NAACP stand for?

      It’s not arguable..he can do what he wants with his hair..it’s not open to debate. Don’t like he has dreads? To bad. I’m pretty certain YOU have the race problem.

      • Tyler Primas | April 1, 2016 at 2:01 pm |

        Idgaf that he’s wearing dreads. I don’t like that he used the word colored.

    • Project much?

      By they way, how would you have liked him to show sensitive?

    • Are people of color, colored people?

  3. Smith Jones | March 29, 2016 at 10:29 pm |

    She assaulted him, charges should be filed.

  4. This is disgusting. A man was assaulted for free expression and you guys sit around attack him in interviews and talk about whether or not he was in the wrong instead of finding Bonita Tindle and interviewing her and interrogating the guilty party.

  5. This Maddie Grey character is obviously lying.

  6. Les De Shay | March 30, 2016 at 4:02 am |

    …this seems more to me like a social experiment…

  7. I don’t think “cultural appropriation” is a crime. Assault and battery is a crime.

    I hope this girl never eats a burrito or pizza or Chinese food. That would be appropriation.

    • Or use Arabic numerals- because you know, they were invented in India and spread to other parts of the world by Arab merchants.

    • BoomBoom252 | April 3, 2016 at 1:53 pm |

      As a Mexican, I don’t approve of her eating food that represents my culture, and my paisanos made sure got to her table. Just kidding, she can. I just hope she chokes on it.

  8. The same people upset over him saying “colored people” are the same people who constantly use POC. No difference.

    • The_Angel_of_Sunrise | March 30, 2016 at 1:40 pm |

      Because colored is outdated and was used to discriminate against nonwhites…

      • Robert K. McClain | March 30, 2016 at 7:33 pm |

        outdated according to whom? You? Some National Governmental Organization? I’m pretty certain if you go in rural areas they still use the word “colored”

      • Not outdated at all. The whole of Southern Africa uses “Colored” to describe mixed race people.

    • charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 4:46 pm |

      No-saying colored is wrong because it is not word salady enough for the regressive left. The proper way to say the ‘colored community’ is- “the community comprised of people of colors many of whom have voluntarily moved to this country for reasons of cultural appropriation and to be pitied and all white people are bigots”. Assuming that these community members can adhere to reasonable standards of behavior displays your hateful xenophobia. Stalin was a sweetie.

  9. “Grey posted about what led up to the recorded incident to her Facebook account on Tuesday, saying, “He called her a bitch after she tried to give him a flyer so she went to talk to him about his dreads and not to call her a bitch (naturally)”

    He instigated the entire thing. Freedom of speech and/or expression does not give him the right to call her a bitch…especially for a flyer? Really? The boy’s probably a Trump supporter underneath those nasty looking dreads.

    • You’re a Hillary Clinton supporter, blaming the victim.

    • I see you calling out somebodies words, but I don’t see you calling out the multiple assaults.

      Why should anybody take you seriously?

    • Robert K. McClain | March 30, 2016 at 7:37 pm |

      There is a problem with your logic. Unless Cory admitted he called her a bitch there is no evidence he did. There is no reason for me to believe what this Grey person said since she has no proof it happened. How do you know she’s not friends with the attacker or some other agenda. The visual evidence shows the woman attacking him, but lets for argument sake say he did call her bitch..i doubt the flyer is what caused him to say it..it was something she said to him that would have set him off to respond that way, but that me speculating just like did..so it leads back to the only thing that matters..the visual evidence..she attacked him..she needs to be prosecuted..the end.

    • Elrod Jones | March 30, 2016 at 10:07 pm |

      does any part of that story really add up to you? Given what we’ve seen of these two in the video, I honestly can’t imagine the following scene playing out:

      “Hey check out this flier.”
      “Bitch!”

      That makes absolutely no rational sense. We have one “eyewitnesses” opinion and we’re given no details about whether or not she knows the parties involved or might have a dog in the fight. What we do see in the video is Tindle harassing the guy and not letting him leave. My hunch is that if he did call her a bitch that it was in response to the same sort of harassment we can all witness for ourselves in the video.

    • David Johnson | March 31, 2016 at 1:42 am |

      You can tell he is a Trump supporter because… You know he called her a bitch because…

    • Joel Holmes | March 31, 2016 at 7:20 pm |

      How about we close ALL of America’s tax-supported public colleges and universities? You governmentally-subsidized “students” ALL seem to have way too much time on your hands!

    • Joel Holmes | March 31, 2016 at 7:34 pm |

      I do not care if she (Tindle) offered Goldstein a new pair of PF Flyers! Tindle, as a political leafleter, does NOT have the right to make a “true threat”, to forcibly cut another student’s hair! Who does Tindle think she is–Mitt Romney (in 1965) or a Southern U.S. State Prison Warden? (If the roles had been reversed, Cory Goldstein would probably be the one sitting in the SF County Jail right now–facing criminal assault and/or “harassment” and “stalking” charges.) Calling someone a “bitch” is protected free non-violent speech–cf. Cohen v. California (1971), or other “free speech” cases. The recipient of a political “flyer,” has the right to refuse to read it. (A purported KKK “activist,” Mr. William Schenk, was recently jailed, in Burlington, VT, on “hate ‘crimes’/speech” charges, for handing a KKK leaflet, to a pair of unwilling recipients: a black-Hispanic lesbian couple. [See Burlington [VT] Free Press, Nov. 13, 2015 and later stories.]) If SFSU represents an example, of the purported “Mainstream” “Left-Liberal/Socialist” alternative to Donald Trump–we are all in serious trouble!

  10. Tindle is black, so nothing will happen to her.

  11. JudicatorDMC | March 30, 2016 at 10:51 am |

    Imagine if a white student attacked a black student for having straightened hair. BLM would be rioting in the streets right now.

    • The_Angel_of_Sunrise | March 30, 2016 at 1:39 pm |

      Why do white people keep saying this? Y’all aint the only ones with straight hair….

      • Praise the Sun | March 30, 2016 at 3:24 pm |

        And black people aren’t only ones who have dreadlocks…This is a hairstyle, nothing more, nothing less. And while some cultures attach to it personally, it can’t stop someone from liking it or wearing.

      • Why do black people keep saying dreads are black culture? Y’all aint the only ones with dreaded hear…

      • And “Y’all” aren’t the only ones with dreads.

    • Lol. Yes, everyone should read the wisdom of an emotional basketcase oppressed by heteronormativity.

  12. Sigmund Fraud | March 30, 2016 at 6:15 pm |

    “He called her a bitch after she tried to give him a flyer so she went
    to talk to him about his dreads and not to call her a bitch
    (naturally).” – I didn’t hear her discussing the “bitch” at all, she was interested only in his hair. It look like Maddy Grey is making this up…

    • My thoughts exactly.

    • Where are the flyers? The obvious question.

    • bigshynepo | April 1, 2016 at 7:42 am |

      And so ‘he calls her a bitch’ and then refrains from getting more obscene as the harassment continues?
      If he was so rude in the first place, why was he not calling her a bitch when she was grabbing, stalking and threatening to cut his hair?

      Someone’s Lying…

  13. Benoit Evans | March 30, 2016 at 9:03 pm |

    Historically, dreadlocks were worn in ancient Egypt and in East Africa. In modern times, they were popularized by in the 1960s and 70s by Bob Marley, a Rastafarian. For Rastafarians, they symbolized the dread or fear of God that believers should have. They have been worn by ancient Greeks, some Indian holy men, ancient Aztec priests, some Tibetan monks (instead of the traditional shaved head), ancient Christian ascetics, Muslim dervishes and Samson (the ancient Israelite, who was a member of the Nazirite sect, known for their locs).

    Considering the widespread presence of dreadlocks, stretching back to the dawn of recorded history, the question becomes, “Who is culturally appropriating whom?”

    From the 1920s to 60s, many Black men wore “conked” hair, which was chemically straightened with lye mixtures. While conked hair was condemned by Malcom X (who himself conked before joining the Nation of Islam) and by other civil rights activists, who saw it as self-degradation, that hair style was generally accepted in the Black community. I have never heard of any prominent person, Black or White, suggesting that entertainers like Chuck Berry, Louis Jordan, Little Richard, James Brown, and the members of The Temptations and The Miracles were guilty of “cultural appropriation”.

    In the early 1940s, the “zoot suit” was invented in Chicago and become very popular among Afro-American musicians and their fans. A young Malcolm X described the zoot suit as: “a killer-diller coat with a drape shape, reet pleats and shoulders padded like a lunatic’s cell”. Zoot suits usually featured a watch chain dangling from the belt to the knee or below, then back to a side pocket. The style was later popular among Chicano, Filipino, and Italian Americans. Has anyone ever accused them of cultural appropriation.

    The whole idea of “cultural appropriation” is offensive, except when it takes the form of misappropriating cultural elements as a way to demean, mock or stereotype other cultures.

    • Matt Leonnig | March 31, 2016 at 10:43 am |

      Locks go back way farther, to India. Africans appropriated them.

      • Exactly. Google image search “Sadhu” (Indian holy men) and you’ll see tonnes of pictures of men with heavily knotted and matted hair. Shiva, a god in Indian lore, is said to don matted hair, and the scriptures that talk about this look of him go back millenia

    • pedroleum | April 4, 2016 at 2:44 am |

      In modern days, however, dreadlocks were essentially popularized by black people (espeacially by reaggae musicians in the 70s and 80s). The reason why they started to wear them was a combination of the rastafari believe not to shave your hair (i. e. going back to the African roots) and because of the curly hair which makes it easier to create them. The hairstyle was adopted by non-blacks especially in the North-American and European counterculture in the 80s and 90s.

      If Maddy Grey’s testimony is true, I understand that Tindle might have perceived a contradiction between Goldstein’s disrespect towards her (calling her with the b-word) and his hairstyle which is essentially going back to a trend set by black people in the modern era when no-one in the developed countries, except black people, used to wear this hairstyle.

  14. SilentPatriot | March 30, 2016 at 10:54 pm |

    In another timeline, she would be running around in Africa wearing only a loincloth.

  15. David Johnson | March 31, 2016 at 1:45 am |

    This is so fucked up. Stop reading into this. Stop being divisive. If you’d prefer another term, ok. But that is not on him. We don’t really know what he said, we know what is reported here: that is all. No one owns a haircut. If you want people to be sympathetic, don’t assault them and threaten to cut their hair. It is not ok to make racist remarks about Africans and their breasts either. We all have to share this planet, let’s get going.

  16. Dan Waterhouse | March 31, 2016 at 5:45 am |

    The moment she would’ve grabbed me, she would’ve been on the ground. I’m sick and tired of these SJWs being out of control.

  17. Vanessa James | March 31, 2016 at 9:00 am |

    In Ancient Greece, kouros sculptures from the Archaic period depict men wearing dreadlocks,[2] while Spartan hoplites (generally described as fair-haired)[3] wore formal locks as part of their battle dress.[4] The style was worn by Ancient Christian Ascetics, and the Dervishes of Islam, among others.[5] Some of the very earliest Christians also may have worn this hairstyle; there are descriptions of James the Just, first Bishop of Jerusalem, who is said to have worn them to his ankles.[6]

    Further, the Celts and Vikings were known to wear them. Dreadlocks popped up independently in Egypt, India, Greece, Ireland, the Nordic countries, the Maori of new Zealand, Buddhists and Jainists in India, and there’s evidence for them in Mayan warriors in the Americas.

  18. Matt Leonnig | March 31, 2016 at 10:42 am |

    “‘I do see it as cultural appropriation,’ said Taylor Hunter, a psychology major who identifies as African American. ”

    You are right, whites and blacks both appropriated it from Indian Yogi culture.

    Such intellectual poverty among the self-righteous PC set.

  19. America was once called the great melting pot because all cultures mixed together to create something unique and new.

    Now we are the great salad bar. Everyone is equal, but separate in their own tidy little containers where there is no danger that a kidney bean and a garbanzo might accidentally meet.

    • Rodrigo Vera | March 31, 2016 at 1:36 pm |

      in a melting pot pressure and heat separates the metals from dross, metals are used to form new useful things and dross is discarded

    • Bad As Can | March 31, 2016 at 2:55 pm |

      Well, someone’s gotta toss the salad

  20. ihatefacebook121 | March 31, 2016 at 2:47 pm |

    Last I heard, she’s been disguising herself as a blonde white girl.

    “That is, like, not me in that video, okay?! I swear on my roommate Andrea’s diary, that is, like, totally not me?”

  21. I don’t think you really need to “reach out” to Ms Tindle. I’m pretty sure the fascism she displays in the video speaks for itself.

  22. Anyone saying “cultural appropriation” is wrong or needs to be stopped needs to make sure they don’t use any technology developed by any culture that isn’t their ancestors, wear any clothes that their ancestors didn’t create, eat any food that wasn’t developed by their perceived culture, etc.

    Oh, and dreads aren’t purely African / Rastafarian: ancient Greeks, including the Spartans could have dreadlocks, among a dozen+ other groups / civilizations. People like Bonita Tingle are just looking for excuses to be racists.

  23. black people did not invent dreadlocks, societies all over the world have had dreadlocks since ancient times, including white societies such as the ancient greeks and celts

  24. Joel Holmes | March 31, 2016 at 7:13 pm |

    Why no CA “hate crimes/ethnic intimidation” charges filed against Ms. Bonita Tindle? (However, Mr. Cory Goldstein is a WEAK spokesman for “dreadlocks”–or for ANYTHING else!) Also, what about all of the U.S. Black males (about 40% or more), who either shave their heads or wear close-cropped hairstyles derived from the U.S. or other Western military forces (starting with the Roman Empire)? Is this a form of “cultural appropriation” also?

    • jazzy dude | April 1, 2016 at 12:48 pm |

      I agree, she bullied him because of he was mild mannered and small in stature. If he was 6’4″ 220 and didn’t take any shit she wouldn’t have said a word to him.

  25. Derwood Wilkinson | March 31, 2016 at 9:28 pm |

    The irony…..she should be hating on her own gay black friend, for appropriating a white women’s fashion style!!

    • charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 5:02 pm |

      Actually xie is appropriating the style of a cartoon investigator -Inspector Gadget. And still no cartoons are rioting-you can bet the inverse would not be true!

  26. What about every black woman that straightens or dyes their hair?

  27. jazzy dude | April 1, 2016 at 5:17 am |

    Who cares about these imbeciles anyway? When she started saying “coming from a place of privilege”, I shut the video off. I guarantee you not one of them know anything about the history of dreadlocks or the cultures they assume are being appropriated. This is getting out of hand.

  28. Are people of color also colored people? So why can’t you say colored people?

    • Bad As Can | April 2, 2016 at 11:14 am |

      I asked the same question and was called a jackass

      • charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 4:48 pm |

        Look bigot the correct term is People of Jackassery or POJ. There are lots of proud POJs running SFSU and if you don’t watch your step they will bray you into submission

    • Some people just LOOK for reasons to be offended.

  29. Madly Grey – if she was flyering, where are here flyers? Did she drop them to go chase this guy down?

  30. Evil Liberal | April 1, 2016 at 6:20 am |

    An experiment in provocation by a wanna be film maker.

  31. OdasbestfriendMingo{◣⊻◢} | April 1, 2016 at 11:47 am |

    if you mute the video, it reads “girl likes guy, guy plays hard to get.”

  32. From the article: “Maddy Grey, a communications major at SF State, said she witnessed the incident and the video was taken halfway through the exchange. Grey posted about what led up to the recorded incident to her Facebook account on Tuesday, saying, ‘He called her a bitch after she tried to give him a flyer so she went to talk to him about his dreads and not to call her a bitch (naturally).’”

    Hey, Maddy Grey, you’re a lying piece of shit and everyone in your school knows it. First, she didn’t try to give him a flyer. He asked for one, and she told him that she didn’t want people with his hair coming to their event.

    As for calling her a bitch, sorry, I’m not buying it. She was continuously provoking him throughout this video laying her hands on him, pulling him down the stairs as he was trying to leave, even threatening him. But despite her obnoxious (and criminal) conduct, and as annoyed as he was getting, he didn’t resort to calling her names. It makes no sense to assume that he called her a bitch before this altercation began, but during the actual incident, as he was getting increasingly irritated, he somehow managed to avoid calling her names.

    I don’t know why you would sully your own reputation as a credible person (which you can no longer claim) with obvious lies. Even if he HAD done what you say (and based on his conduct during this incident and in subsequent interviews, I have a LOT of trouble believing that), that does not excuse her conduct. There are no names you can call anyone that would justify putting your hands on someone.

  33. From the article: “Maddy Grey, a communications major at SF State, said she witnessed the incident and the video was taken halfway through the exchange. Grey posted about what led up to the recorded incident to her Facebook account on Tuesday, saying, ‘He called her a bitch after she tried to give him a flyer so she went to talk to him about his dreads and not to call her a bitch (naturally).’”

    Hey, Maddy Grey, you’re a liar and everyone in your school knows it. That should make your relationships with your fellow students somewhat strained. First, she didn’t try to give him a flyer. He asked for one, and she told him that she didn’t want people with his hair coming to their event.

    As for calling her a bitch, sorry, I’m not buying it. She was continuously provoking him throughout this video, laying her hands on him, pulling him down the stairs as he was trying to leave, even threatening him. But despite her obnoxious (and criminal) conduct, and as annoyed as he was getting, he somehow managed to avoid calling her names. It makes no sense to assume that he called her a bitch before this altercation began, but during the actual incident, as he was getting increasingly irritated, he suddenly adopted the manners of a Sunday School teacher.

    I don’t know why you would sully your own reputation as a credible person (which you can no longer claim) with obvious lies, but it was a very stupid thing for you to do. Even if he HAD done what you say (and based on his conduct during this incident and in subsequent interviews, I have a LOT of trouble believing that), that does not excuse her conduct. There are no names you can call anyone that would justify putting your hands on someone. So, ultimately, you accomplished nothing with this lie other than damaging your own reputation. Good job, Maddy.

    • pedroleum | April 4, 2016 at 2:52 am |

      Quote: “Hey, Maddy Grey, you’re a liar and everyone in your school knows it.
      That should make your relationships with your fellow students somewhat
      strained. First, she didn’t try to give him a flyer. He asked for one,
      and she told him that she didn’t want people with his hair coming to
      their event.”

      Where do you know that from?

  34. Daemon Mori'khai | April 2, 2016 at 11:00 am |

    I don’t believe the “bitch” comment any more than I believe the “white guys leaning out the pickup truck yelling the n-word” at Mizzou. Sounds like typical neoprogressives lying about race hate to justify their own violent, virulent racism. White kids in dreads don’t casually call a black woman a “bitch” in passing. Sounds like total fiction.

    • Especially not the type of guy that isn’t pressing charges and pretty much wants to apologise to HER?!?!

  35. KC Schultz | April 2, 2016 at 11:44 pm |

    Please sign and share the petition to make sure she does not get away
    with her actions.

    https://www.change.org/p/san-francisco-state-university-remove-bonita-tindle-from-campus-for-intimidation-racism-and-bullying

  36. Ian Weaver | April 3, 2016 at 4:30 am |

    It’s quite obvious he is non-aggressive and she is aggressive. The he called her a bitch accusation is obviously a lie or being taken out of context. He said that this started when he asked for a flyer and she refused on account of his race and hair, if he called her a bitch at that point who could blame him.

    Why can’t the activists, Bonita Tindle and those who support her take a good long look at themselves and admit that in this instance they were wrong. Instead we have some very disturbing malicious dishonesty going on. Firstly by Bonita who clearly during her assault on him accuses him of assault. I suspect that if it were not for video evidence she would have filed charges against him. Secondly by Maddy Grey and other blatantly obvious allies on saying he called her a bitch for no reason to initiate the argument. This man wears dreadlocks because he loves the culture, you are targeting an ally with false accusations and victim blaming into the bargain.

  37. SuperRyan | April 3, 2016 at 8:11 am |

    Maddy Grey is full of shit. It doesn’t make sense that this kid would call Bonita Tindle a bitch simply for trying to hand him a flyer. Also, if she witnessed the moments right before the incident, why was she nowhere to be seen in the video. Not once in the video was there any mention of someone being called a bitch.

    So congratulations Ms. Grey, for the rest of your life, whenever someone googles your name, it will come out that you are a liar.

  38. ihatefacebook121 | April 3, 2016 at 1:35 pm |

    I heard that both Cory and Bonita have assumed new identities to avoid further controversy and unwanted media attention.

    Cory now looks like this:
    http://17r1l63fshd52dy9yakdizhkog.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Snoop-Dogg-Publicity-645×370.jpg

    And Bonita now looks like this:
    http://www.pajamadeen.com/images/miss-south-carolina-caitlin-upton.jpg

  39. BoomBoom252 | April 3, 2016 at 2:48 pm |

    Bonita, I wonder if you realize that your name is the SPANISH word for pretty. You’re appropriating my language, and are probably only keeping that name cause it’s “cute”. Sorry, but I don’t approve, so change it.

  40. “– it’s not even a part of the colored community’s culture,” Goldstein

    Have college students brought back the word colored? I know they say people of color now but to say the colored community sounds odd to me.

  41. starrystarfish | April 14, 2016 at 8:17 am |

    Even if someone does call you a bitch, you’re not allowed to physically prevent them from leaving, threaten to cut their hair off, and then grab some random dude’s camera. Also it seems weird that you would change the subject to cultural appropriation right after someone calls you a B****, and also odd that your make friend would not be chiming in, and would just be standing around looking bored right after another guy calls you a bitch… but maybe that’s just me.

  42. Maddy Grey is a stinkin liar

  43. otisrneedleman | April 20, 2016 at 11:17 pm |

    “Cultural appropriation” is bullshit, people. This is America. Everyone has the right to dress and groom themselves as they please without any fools hassling them about it. Stand up for your rights, people.

    • charlightte | April 22, 2016 at 12:47 am |

      Cultural appropriation is not bullshit in the sense that european Americans have been stalked like nobodies’ business for the purpose of ‘cultural appropriation’ by peoples who demand our culture-can’t abide by it even when give leg-ups and are violent. People of European descent are the ones being harmed and exploited.

      As the great philosopher Sam Hyde said: “It’s called the knock-out game and white people are tired of playing”

      • otisrneedleman | April 22, 2016 at 7:44 am |

        I hear you but you have also touched on the bigger problem – the balkanization of Americans. My grandfather came from Europe but I am not a European-American. I am an American, pure and simple. Doesn’t matter where my ancestors came from. Doesn’t matter where your ancestors came from. If you were born here or are naturalized, you’re an American. And everyone has the right to dress and groom themselves as they please without taking any shit about it from idiots.

        • charlightte | April 22, 2016 at 11:12 am |

          I used to believe exactly like you do now. Then I started to notice how while not a reliable way to judge an individual- in the aggregate people of certain races influence societies in predictable ways. When you take these behaviors and map them to the geographies of origin they make evolutionary sense. For example Nordic people are famous for their sense of timeliness and if you are from the land of the ice and snow you can’t afford to wait around because you may freeze to death. Our ancestors that did not have order and timeliness-who could not be trusted or fair simply died due to our harsh weather.

          What is really amazing is when you look around and see that despite being here 100s of years we do not assimilate. Other cultures desire our way of life because we are orderly and this enables a lot of people to have some. Instead of cultures that rely on bribing your way out of traffic tickets etc. Biology per se is a kind of grammar and sadly we don’t seem to be able to communicate fluently outside of our own.

  44. charlightte | April 21, 2016 at 4:39 pm |

    I am pretty sure she is gray

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