Lt. Gov Eleni Kounalakis, Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester and Board of Trustees Chair Wenda Fong listen to public comments during the CSU meeting in Long Beach on Sept. 13, 2023 (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress)
Lt. Gov Eleni Kounalakis, Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester and Board of Trustee’s Chair Wenda Fong listen to public comments during the CSU meeting in Long Beach on Sept. 13, 2023 (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress)
Daniel Hernandez

Live Updates: CSU Board of Trustees votes to increase tuition

Tuition will increase by 6% a year for the next five years

Sept 13, 3:30 p.m.

Reporting by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

The main event:

The board passes the multi-year tuition increase 15-5.

California State Student Association president Dominic Quan Treseler and students sitting in the meeting walk out.

Sept 13, 3:24 p.m.

Reporting by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Board votes on amendment to tuition proposal:

The proposed amendment to reduce the five year tuition increase to four years fails 8-12. 

Sept 13, 3:18 p.m.

Reporting by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Board looking at amending tuition increase proposal:

Student trustee Diana Aguilar-Cruz has motioned to reduce the five-year hike proposal to four years as a way to compromise on students paying up to $7,682 by fall 2028. With this proposed amendment, tuition would be raised by $7,248 by fall 2027. 

However, trustee Jack McGrory believes that the current five year plan would ensure predictability for the 23 campuses.

Sept 13, 3:05 p.m.

Reporting by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Official vote on tuition policy begins:

The board has voted to pass the tuition policy 17-2.

Sept 13, 2:32 pm.

Reporting by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Board reconvenes after lunch:

After a lunch break, the board has reconvened and the full board is officially in session. The board has started their meeting by watching a video about San Jose State University.

Sept 13, 1:37 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Vote on Tuition Increase Passes on Financial Committee:

The California State University Committee on Finance voted 9-0 to approve a 34% multi-year tuition increase at the CSU Office of the Chancellor’s Office in Long Beach on Sept. 13.

The proposal will be presented to the full board for a vote later today.

Sept 13, 1:20 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Student Trustee speaks on student experiences:

Student trustee Jonathan Molina Mancio asks the board why it cannot take success stories from across the CSU and lobby the state government for more funding. 

Student Trustee Aguilar-Cruz thanks the California State Student Association for bringing Associated Student members from across the CSU to speak for the students. She also thanked California State University Los Angeles SQE members for being at the meeting today.

She then asked for the board to compromise on the proposal and to lower the five-year increase down to “at least four years” while holding a self-made Maslov’s Hierarchy of Needs chart.

Sept 13, 1:06 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Former SFSU student and trustee speaks on his experience:

Trustee Jose Antonio Vargas, an SF State alumni, spoke on his experience going to university as a Filipino immigrant who had to work full-time in order to pay for rent and to send money back to The Philippines to his family.

He also reminded the board that there is no other path to help fix the deficit and that he would also reluctantly be in favor of the increase.

Sept 13, 12:47 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustee Fong speaks to the board:

Wenda Fong, chair of the board of trustees, reminded the board that the tuition increase would not fix the deficit. She said the board needs to continue looking at the budget past this potential increase and work to address the deficit. There are six more speakers before the vote on the Multi-Year budget proposal.

Student attendees express frustration with trustees’ comments during the board meeting on Sept. 13, 2023. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

Sept 13, 12:43 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustee to vote in favor of tuition increase ‘for the first time in career:’

Trustee Douglas Faigan said that in his time on the board, he has never been in favor of a tuition increase. However, due to the financial deficit, he will support the tuition increase for the first time.

Faigan’s main concern is that the tuition increase proposal is a long time compromise. He recommended the board to vote on a change of time period from five years to three years. After three years, he suggests that the board vote again.

Sept 13, 12:36 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustee believes tuition increase is the only solution:

Trustee Leslie Gilbert-Laurie said that she reluctantly will vote in favor of the tuition increase because they have not found another solution to fix the $1.5 billion deficit. She also said that among the public commenters, none of them presented an ideal alternative to pay for the deficit.

She finalized her statements by referencing critiques from public commenters that they are not just sitting “up there with Gucci glasses” and that they are working hard to ensure the CSU system continues to function.

Sept 13, 12:20 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustee Lillian Kimbell expressed that although 40% of students may suffer from a tuition increase, 100% of students would suffer if the proposal is not passed. She is going to vote in favor of the tuition increase.

Board of Trustee member Lillian Kimbell during the CSU meeting on Sept. 13, 2023. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

Sept 13, 12:13 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustee discussion on the Multi-Year Tuition Proposal begins:

Trustee Jack McGrory addressed criticism that the board should use the system’s reserves to pay for the $1.5 billion deficit by explaining that a majority of the reserve funds are already allocated for bondholders, capital improvements, contracts already awarded and auxiliary funds. 

McGrory finalized his statement by saying he would like the board to vote on this proposal today and to not, “kick the can down the road.” 

Lt. Gov Eleni Kounalakis asked for the pie chart to be brought up again and criticized the board for going into a decision unprepared.

She explained that there is no data on the 40% of students who will be impacted by the tuition increase and recommends delaying the vote to allow the incoming chancellor to be a part of this discussion.

Sept 13, 11:54 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

CSU presentation continues:

CSU Ryan Storm recommends to the trustees that they vote to accept the tuition increase. Discussion on the proposal from all members will begin shortly.

Sept 13, 11:39 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

CSU presentation on the Multi-Year Tuition Proposal:

CSU Assistant Vice Chancellor Ryan Storm presents the Multi-Year Tuition Proposal. Storm previously showcased a presentation on CSU’s operating budget where he discussed how revenue would be increased by $148 million next year if the proposal is accepted.

Storm also explained that the new revenue would be spent on increased funding for the State University Grant program, Title IX implementation, faculty compensation and more.

Storm showcased a pie chart on undergraduate tuition payments. The graph showcases that 40% of students who receive partial or no non-loan aid. He made it clear that an increase in tuition would not affect the 60% of students who are fully covered by non-loan aid.

Sept 13, 10:58 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustees discuss tuition policy:

Trustees rejected a motion to postpone the tuition policy vote to their next meeting in November. Student Trustee Aguilar-Cruz asked a trustee on the Committee on Finance to motion to reduce the five-year plan to four years. None of the trustee members motioned. 

After the discussion, the board will go on to vote on the tuition raise.

Sept 13, 10:04 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustees continue to speak on Financial Aid policies:

The board has still not voted on the multi-year tuition increase as scheduled on the agenda.

Dumke Auditorium during the CSU Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach, CA on Sept. 13, 2023. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

The trustees are currently asking questions on how financial aid works across the 23 campuses. Trustee Aguilar-Cruz added that she believes CSU is losing potential students due to the lack of outreach and education about Dream Act opportunities undocumented students may qualify for.

 

The vote for the multi-year tuition increase is expected to occur after the end of this action item.

 

Sept 13, 9:50 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustees begin action item on Financial Aid:

The trustees have completed a presentation on a potential state-wide financial aid policy that could help CSU students receive assistance in the future. The board again references yesterday’s public comment and the shared sentiment of affordability. 

Trustee Julia I. Lopez spoke on how a majority of students in the CSU system receive some form of financial aid to pay for tuition costs. However, she also added that the other costs of attendance like housing, transportation, and food costs should be also addressed by CSU. She also explained that each university has its own qualifications for students to receive financial aid and that this could be addressed with a state-wide policy. 

“We really need to look into the infrastructure to allow our students to receive the maximum amount of financial aid possible,” Lopez said.

Sept 13, 9:13 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustees begin action item Education Policy:

The board has finished its conversation on the Title IX action item and has begun a conversation on Academic Planning.

The upcoming vote on the proposed multi-year tuition increase is expected to begin after the end of the presentation on the Strategic Workgroup’s report on Financial Aid.

Sept 13, 9 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Board of Trustees is wrapping up conversation on Title IX:

The trustees are having an ongoing conversation on a recent Ttitle IX report by Cozen O’Connor, a San Francisco law firm.

Kounalakis has asked several questions on the potential of hiring new staff across the 23 campuses and referenced the upcoming tuition increase vote on why she is concerned with hiring new staff. She believes the proposed solution is expensive and would create more barriers for students looking for help when faced with sexual assault and gender discrimination.

Sept 13, 8:13 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustee and California Lt. Governor speak with students:

As a small group of students from California State University Los Angeles gathered outside of the CSU Office of the Chancellor, student trustee member Diana Aguilar-Cruz approached the crowd. Aguilar-Cruz spoke with students about their concerns and expressed that she urged other trustees to delay the vote until the following meeting. Her hope in asking the trustees to delay was to allow students from across the 23 CSU campuses to learn about the proposed increase.

Student trustee member, Diana Aguilar-Cruz in Dumke Auditorium during the CSU Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach on Sept. 13, 2023. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

 

However, the CSULA students retorted and explained that they have been working for months, since the announcement of the proposal, to warn and educate their fellow students on the hike.

Afterward, Lt. Gov Eleni Kounalakis and State Superintendent of Public Instruction for K-12,  Tony Thurmond spoke to the students on the vote. Kounalakis expressed that she does not believe that there are enough opposing votes in order to reject the proposal. Thurmond spoke on his university experience and how he would like to work with students in finding solutions to help lower college costs.

Sept 13, 8:05 a.m.

Reported by Letícia Luna in San Francisco, CA and Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Small gathering of local college students arrive:

The California State College Board of Trustees reconvene for their final day of meetings. The board is set to vote on the proposed tuition increase at around 9 a.m.

A small group of students from local universities gather outside of the CSU Office of the Chancellor and prepare to watch the impending vote.

Sept 12, 12:39 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Interim Chancellor Addresses Students’ Concerns:

California State Student Association president Dominic Quan Treseler, in his report to the CSU Board of Trustees, urged the board to vote against the proposed tuition increase.

“The short-term revenue gains must be balanced against the compassionate financial and emotional strain placed on our students,” Treseler said. Referring to the student leaders’ public comments from earlier in the meeting he said that they are “the collective voices of nearly half a million CSU students and the echoing chorus of those voices are pleading with you now.”

Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester thanked Treseler for his report and pivoted to address the criticism she received for the videos the chancellor’s office sent to faculty and staff. Koester doubled down on her belief that the CSU will need to make painful and difficult choices if the bargaining impasse continues. Afterward, the interim chancellor addressed the board on their vote tomorrow.

“At the conclusion of their presentations tomorrow, you are going to be asked to take action on the proposals. There is never a good time to raise tuition. There is never an easy time to raise tuition. Students are not going to actively support a tuition increase. To expect otherwise, I think, may be in the world of fantasy,” Koester said.

“I know that, as trustees, you are uncomfortable. And I appreciate your discomfort, it is to be expected. ….But I would say we have been responsive to the many concerns of the students so that at least 60% of the students will not be affected by the increase. So while there is no easy time to raise tuition, there is a time when it becomes an undeniable imperative. That time is now. The evidence is irrefutable,” she added.

Sept. 12, 11:45 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Dual Protests:

As public comment wrapped up, students, faculty and staff gathered outside the building to participate in further demonstration against the proposal.

California Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis addresses students outside the CSU Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach on Sept. 12, 2023 (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

Union leaders spoke on what occurred during public comment and then led the members on a march around the building.

Then, a student-led protest grew around the entrance of the CSU Chancellor’s office. Organization leaders took turns on the mic to speak out on their experience facing the board. 

As the student-speakers wrapped up their messages to the protesters, California Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, exited the building and took the opportunity to engage with students by praising their willingness to share opinions on the issue. 

“You took hours out of your day. Many of you had to drive. It costs you money, it costs you time. It is hard, it feels aggravating, it feels frustrating,” Kounalakis told the crowd. “But I just want to say it matters –– What you have done today matters. I am going to go back in there over the next two days and I am going to keep repeating and articulating what you said. Coming here today, making your voices heard, continuing to push your message on social media over the next two days. Let’s do this. Let’s get some more votes to stand with me. No tuition increases.”

Sept. 12, 11:40 a.m. 

Reported by Letícia Luna in San Francisco, CA

Public comments are interrupted and concluded: 

After about two hours and 30 minutes of public comments and a protest interruption, Board Chair Wenda Fong demanded a break as the protesters walked out of the Dumke Auditorium. Fong restarted the meeting thanking public speakers who voiced their opinions and added that the board extended their public comment hours “so that we could hear your voices, and heard your voices, we did.”

Sept. 12, 10:46 a.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA and Steven Rissotto in San Francisco, CA

Students are speaking up:

SFSU League of Filipinos members Alexandra Bartas, David Chan and Felix Rosell have submitted public comments to the board. 

“How do you expect students to work more hours while taking on a full course load? This just shows how the Board of Trustees is divorced from the actual conditions of the masses, and how they fail to consider the burden that these tuition increases will place on working class students, especially working class Filipino youth who represent the largest population of Asian American students in the CSU system,” Chan said during the public comments. “It’s clear that the Board of Trustees would much rather hoard the wealth for themselves and for the highest paid executives in the CSU, replacing the burden of meeting union demands for higher wages on to students and this is fundamentally wrong.”

Bartas is among the many California State University students from across the 23 campuses who entered the auditorium and spoke up against the tuition increase.

Alexandra Bartas, member of the SFSU League of Filipinos, after speaking to the Board of Trustees in Long Beach, CA, on Sep. 12, 2023. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress)
(Daniel Hernandez)

“All of us see exactly what you’re doing and we will not allow it,” Bartas said during public comment. “The more you try to exploit students resources to enrich your own pockets, the more we will resist. With each step you take to drive students further into destitution, we will be right there. A united force of students, staff and faculty knocking at your doorstep.

Trust me when I tell you that you will want to vote no on the tuition hike.”

Although each speaker has spoken on their personal story, their concerns have held a similar message; raising tuition prices will negatively impact low-income and minority students.

Sept. 12, 10:15 a.m.

Reported By Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Union members speak up:

Comments from student representatives have winded down and union members from both Teamsters and the California Faculty Association are continuing to speak on the ongoing bargaining impasse.

As members submit public comments, the California Faculty Association vice president yells, “shut it down” in reference to the prospect of a faculty strike, followed by a chorus of union members yelling the same phrase afterward.

Sept. 12, 10:05 a.m.

Reported by Michelle Ruano in San Francisco, CA.

SFSU Associated Students host watch party for the CSU Board of Trustees meeting:

The San Francisco State University Associated Students held a watch party for the California State University Board of Trustees Meeting in Long Beach on Sep. 12, 2023. The watch party was held in the Rosa Parks Conference Room D in the Cesar Chavez Student Center. 

Christine Amador, senior manager of administration and governance, organized the event open to all students. 

“Ultimately this proposed tuition increase affects all students in different ways but particularly the 40% that will have to shoulder the burden of the 6% increase on a yearly basis, that’s 200,000 students, that’s not a small number,” Amador said.

The SFSU Associated Students flew down two members to make public comments. AS Chief of Staff Iese Esera and Chair of the AS Board of Directors gave live public comments at the meeting.

Students watch the CSU Board of Trustees public comment meeting regarding the tuition hike increase of 6% hosted by SFSU Associated Students in the Cesar Chavez building’s lower conference level Rosa Parks D on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2023. (Bryan Chavez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Bryan Chavez)

Nox Burrill, a member of the SFSU Young Democratic Socialists of America (YSDA), was one of the few students who attended the watch party. They said, “I feel like tuition is very important to me and everyone else here. Of course, it’s going to affect a lot of students, but it’s going to hit hard on students who grew up impoverished and people who already have to start taking out loans because of how high it is already.”

The CSU Board of Trustees watch party will be taking place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The CSU will be live streaming the meeting on their website from Sept. 10-13.

Sept. 12, 10 a.m.

Reported By Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

Trustees meeting continues:

An hour into public comment, the protesters’ chants outside the Glenn S. Dumke Auditorium can still be heard.

SF State Associated Students Chief of Staff Iese Esera speaks during the CSU Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach on Sept. 12, 2023 (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress). (Daniel Hernandez)

 

Student representatives from across the state are still lined up behind both podiums and have continued to express their opposition to the proposal — including Iese Esera, San Francisco State University Associated Students chief of staff.

“This proposal was thrown at students with little transparency as this is the first full month that students are back in school since the spring semester and there’s already a vote in this governing body that remains, and does not address the inequitable gaps that remain in the CSU,” Esera told the board. “We all are in this room because we love the CSU. You sit at this esteemed table because you’re supposed to love the CSU. So the CSU is nothing without the students. Without the success of the CSU, the mission can only be measured by the ethical success and well being of our students. Find another way.”

Some representatives, after submitting public comment, have left the auditorium and have joined the protesters outside.

California Faculty Association members are also submitting public comments on both the topic of the bargaining impasse and the proposed hike.

Sept. 12, 9:07 a.m.

Reported By Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

California State University Board of Trustees meeting begins:

The CSU Board of Trustees meeting is underway. The meeting started with public comment, where five students have spoken against the proposed 6% multi-year tuition increase.

Loud chants, drum beats, and horns from protesters outside can be heard in the background. It has remained unwavering since the start of the meeting. 

Almost every in-person speaker has been an Associated Students member from their campus and all of the student speakers have opposed the tuition increase.

Virtual public comment has concluded and the board has asked that all remaining in-person speakers line up behind each podium to speak.

Sept. 12, 9 a.m.

Reported by Michelle Ruano in San Francisco, CA

CSU explains its intention to increase tuition prices:

The CSU held a student media press briefing about the tuition proposal on Sep. 6, 2023. Reporters and editors from CSU publications across the state were given the time to ask questions about the tuition raise.

Chart showing the raise in the CSU tuition increase proposal. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

Steve Relyea, executive vice chancellor of business and finance and chief financial officer, began the meeting. According to Relyea, interim chancellor Koester formed a “sustainable financial model work group,” composed of students, alumni, trustees, faculty, presidents, campus chief financial officers, and academic officers. The work group, as stated by Relyea, was in charge of recommending a multi-year strategy that would attain stable and “predictable revenues” that support the CSUs and their students.

In a presentation provided by Ryan Storm, assistant vice chancellor for budget, he stated that the annual tuition rate increases would be 6% per year for all levels of education. The first increase would be $342 for the academic year for full-time California undergraduate students. The tuition proposal will be in place for 5 years, estimated to be re-assessed around 2029.

Storm claims, “The tuition proposal will generate new revenue of $148 million [first-year estimate].”  The CSU plans to increase student financial aid by $49 million. As stated in his presentation, the five-year estimate of new revenue is $840 million and financial aid will increase $280 million.

Chart showing the number of impacted students by the tuition increase proposal. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

As stated by Storm, the incoming tuition money would go toward increasing funding for the State University Grant program, including:

  • Academic and student services support
  • Basic needs and mental health services
  • Title IX implementation and ongoing costs
  • Infrastructure, including new facilities and ongoing maintenance
  • Compensation to attract and retain outstanding faculty and staff

“The revenue from the tuition proposal is absolutely essential for this university to serve its students and provide them with the educational opportunities that they deserve coupled with a robust financial aid plan that protects those students with the greatest need,” said Relyea.

If the proposal is approved, it is expected to begin as soon as Fall 2024. The CSU will make the vote on the proposed tuition increase on Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 8 a.m.

Sept. 11, 10:50 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

California Faculty Association to join students:

The California Faculty Association, in a press release sent earlier today, declared it is opposed to the proposed 6% multi-year tuition increase.

California Faculty Association members look on during public comment during the CSU Board of Trustees meeting at the CSU Long Beach on Sept. 12, 2023. (Daniel Hernandez / Golden Gate Xpress) (Daniel Hernandez)

The organization also announced that its members will rally alongside students at the Sept. 12-13 California State University Board of Trustees meeting.

The organization and CSU’s attempts to bargain for a new contract have led to an impasse. 

In a student press briefing, the CSU expressed that one of its top priorities was “compensation to attract and retain outstanding faculty and staff.” However, CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester expressed in an unlisted YouTube video sent out to faculty that the 23 campuses would have to make “difficult and painful decisions if the California Faculty Association continues to push further with its demands. 

Sept. 11, 7:15 p.m.

Reported by Daniel Hernandez in Long Beach, CA

What you can expect at the board meeting tomorrow: 

The California State University Board of Trustees meeting will be held on Sept. 12 at 9 a.m. in CSU Long Beach’s Dumke Auditorium. The day will open with public comment according to the CSU board agenda.

Some San Francisco State University Associated Student members are expected to be present at the meeting, alongside students from across the CSU system, to comment against the proposed tuition increase publicly. Students also had an opportunity to sign up for virtual public comment.

The board will vote on the Multi-Year Tuition Proposal on Sept. 13 at 9 a.m., according to the agenda.

Students hold signs in opposition of proposed tuition increase and take turns speaking into the megaphone at SF State, Monday, Sep. 11, 2023. (Matthew Ali / Golden Gate Xpress) (Matthew Ali)

Important facts to know about the tuition proposal before tomorrow’s meeting:

If approved, the proposal would increase yearly tuition by 6% every year for the next five years. Undergraduates taking more than six units will see their yearly tuition increase by $1,940 by fall 2028. Graduate students taking more than six units will see their yearly tuition increase by $2,436 by fall 2028.

After 2028, the board must assess the impact of the increase and can vote to continue rate changes for fall 2029 and beyond.

Read more about the proposed tuition increase here.

 

Sept. 11, 12:00 p.m.

Reported by Adriana Hernandez in San Francisco, CA

 

Around 300 students gathered at San Francisco State University’s Malcolm X Plaza to voice their opposition against the 6% CSU tuition increase proposal, which will be decided by vote Wednesday at the Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach. Read the extended coverage here.

 

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributors
Neal Wong, Co-Copy Editor
Neal Wong (he/him) is a third-year journalism student and minoring in urban studies and planning. He was born and raised in San Francisco and attended Washington High School. He has photographed and written for Golden Gate Xpress first as a contributor, then as a photographer, and now as a copy editor. His photos have also been published by the San Francisco Bay ViewSan Francisco Public Press, Mission Local, and Xpress Magazine. Neal has also created and taught four SFSU Experimental College courses. His hobbies include traveling, cooking, and reading.
Matthew Ali, Staff Reporter
Matthew Ali is a reporter for the Golden Gate Xpress. He is a journalism major and works as a wedding and portrait photographer. He is from Los Angeles. He is also of a particularly nerdy persuasion. He enjoys comics, video games, fantasy novels, and tabletop games. He also aspires to write fiction and eventually comic books for DC and Marvel Comics.
Daniel Hernandez, Spanish Editor
Daniel Hernandez (he/him) is a transfer student from the Inland Empire majoring in bilingual journalism. He also oversees Golden Gate Xpress' Spanish section. His passion for storytelling and journalism started after he bought his first camera six years ago. What began as a fascination for taking photos and videos grew into a passion for multimedia journalism. When he isn't researching for an article or working as the Spanish editor, he explores the Bay Area or falls down a YouTube rabbit hole. Daniel Hernandez (él/ellos) es un estudiante transferido de Inland Empire con especialización en periodismo bilingüe. También es el editor de la sección en español de Golden Gate Xpress. Su pasión por el periodismo comenzó después de que compró su primera cámara hace seis años. Lo que comenzó como una fascinación por tomar fotografías y vídeos se convirtió en una pasión por el periodismo multimedia. Cuando no está investigando para un artículo o trabajando como editor de la sección en español, explora el Área de la Bahía o cae en una madriguera de YouTube.
Bryan Chavez, Multimedia Editor
Bryan Chavez (he/him) is a reporter for SF State’s Golden Gate Xpress. He is a senior pursuing a major in Journalism with a minor in Sociology. As a lifelong resident of the Bay Area, Bryan aspires to become a beat writer for the Golden State Warriors or any other major league sports team in the region. Beyond his journalistic pursuits, he enjoys engaging in hobbies such as hiking, painting, and building with Legos during his free time.

Comments (0)

All Golden Gate Xpress Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *