EGAY hosts its 14th Annual All Dragged Up spectacle

Considered an unlucky day in Western culture, Friday the 13th turned out to be a huge extravaganza for Everything Great About You’s (EGAY) 14th annual All Dragged Up event at SF State.

With wigs whipping back and forth, lip sync battles and not to mention a safe space for LGBTQ+ students, thirteen diverse drag performers left the stage blazing hot with stunning performances to help fundraise money for the nonprofit organization. Proceeds went to the  LGBTQ+ Youth Foundation located in the Mission District.

Pulling no punches throughout the night was host and President Chloe Bogle and co-host Kailoni Green of EGAY, who hyped the crowded venue with witty banter.  

Bogle, a political science major, got involved with the organization three years ago during her freshman year.

“This is the accumulation of our hard work, week to week,” she said. “We’re just kids in residential life trying to create a space and give back to the community as much as we can.”

Performing at All Dragged Up for their third year is Andy Lopez, who opened up the event as Anya Cox and later as Adonis Cox. The humanities and museum studies major said, “In real life, I’m definitely not as eccentric. It’s very liberating, the ability to explore different aspects of myself that I don’t think I would have enough courage, out of drag.”

 

Drag performer, Misty Zaster, grabs a dollar from Bishop Malik, an attendee of SFSU’s 14th annual All Dragged Up show. Student organizers from EGAY (Everything Great About You), hosted the show at the Seven Hills Conference Center on campus, on Friday, April 13, 2018. (Amarah Hernandez/Golden Gate Xpress)

With very little limitations to how risque the performances could be, some performers brought more fire to the stage by taking off their clothes and making out on stage, as seen by performers Jamie Click and Ven Zide.

Singing a duet together, Click and Zide  performed “Dead Girl Walking from “Heathers: The Musical.” The hyper-sexual performance, found Click singing on top of Zide who laid across the stage floor. “We asked the presidents if we can strip on stage and they said as long as your genitals are covered,” said BECA major Zide.

The unique art form known as drag is revolutionizing today’s generation and inspiring individuals to embrace both  masculinity and femininity by bringing a sense of self to the forefront in everyday life without feeling stonewalled by orthodox ideas.

Sam Hengesbach, who goes by Mistess Muffet, said, “I’ve been trying out drag since I was a  little kid that’s how I found my gender queerness. I didn’t know there was an option to be anything else but female.”

When finding out about RuPaul’s Drag Race, “I found out about drag kings and thought I can embody that masculeness inside me. Then I found the word gender fluid and I was like f–k that’s actually me,” said Hengesbach.

Today’s millennials seem to be trying to deconstruct the way that society views drag. Each performer uses different mediums and tools that try to captivate the audience. While each performance has its own uniqueness, all of these art forms lean towards the same end goal that is  artistic self-expression through the individual’s ideas and intentions.

“Drag has evolved overtime. Drag is an expression of how people want to feel within that moment of being a drag queen or king and people are adding ideas into what it means to be in drag,” said co-President of EGAY Kailoni Green.

No comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.