Life

Relationships formed on air

September 14, 2018

Relationships formed on air

Radio DJs are taking the SF State media world by storm with many new additions to the broadcast and electronic communication arts department.

New music and various genres inspire student DJs — along with provocative conversations on the societal issues surrounding them, music and culture.

SF State got started with its first online radio station, KSFS, in 1946. Ever since, the radio station has produced hundreds of radio shows presenting new sounds and passing the mic to new opinions. The radio station is including a new studio dedicated strictly to podcasting this fall semester.

CJ Adkins, a general manager of KSFS, described how there are more new faces of radio than ever before, as well as many taking on managerial positions. The collaboration between up-and-coming SF State musical artists and radio DJs has created bonds and mutually supportive alliances.

Adkins became involved with radio due to an unexpected change in his career path.

“I was a business major at the time when I was referred to a BECA ‘intro to radio’ class,” Adkins said. “Two years later I’m a BECA major and working as general manager at KSFS.”Adkins hosts his own show on the station, “Shoutout Radio”, which airs every Monday from 8-10:30 p.m. He finds that his show is different because it’s full of music and sporadic conversation that reflect the functions of his own audible mind.

“When creating my show I am never really trying to tap into a specific audience,” Adkins said. “I have my peers in mind, but at the end of the day I want to make something that I, myself, want to listen to.”

Tania Magallanes, also known as T-Mags, hosts her own radio show, dubbed “T Time,” which airs every Thursday from 7-8 p.m. and covers all things rap and hip-hop. Through this show, she has been able to make more connections and friends.

When asked about the radio community at SF State, Magallanes beamed with smiles. “It’s such a welcoming community, everyone has been so helpful. Everyone’s supporting each other, they all want to be on each others’ shows, everyone’s shouting everyone out,” Magallanes said. “I’ve met a lot of people just because of my radio show.”

Many BECA students lean towards the major and radio to be freely expressive and not tied down to only talking about news. Magallanes started out studying to be a news broadcaster but eventually veered toward radio production.

“I leaned toward radio broadcasting because I wanted to input my own opinion rather than stating facts, the news and what’s going on,” Magallanes said. “Rather than reporting on these things that are super heartbreaking, I wanted to report on things that I’m super passionate about.”

Magallanes, like many other radio DJs at SF State, feels the need to enlighten her listeners with artists who are “slept on.” Two lesser known Atlanta rappers she often plays on her show are Young Nudy and Hoodrich Pablo Juan. “I feel like it’s my job to bring them to light,” she said.

Many SF State radio DJs also want to cultivate a mutually supportive relationship with their guests and featured artists.

Juan Leon, host of radio show “Juan Solo” on Fridays from 8-9:30 p.m., was inspired to pursue his interests by some radio DJs in the limelight.

“Some people who I tremendously respect today are Zane Lowe and Julie Adenuga,” Leon said of his radio show admirations. “They’re both pioneers of becoming more than just a radio DJ, with incredible contributions to their respective music scenes and admiration from artists.”

Throughout all the different types of shows KSFS has produced, all hosts have had at least one thing in mind: be a radio DJ who creates an alliance between viewers and guests. As Magallanes said of her job, “You just get to meet so many people and hear music all day long, so it’s pretty dope. I like what I do.”

SF State’s many student-run radio shows are streamable all day, every day, at the KSFS Media website.

Alexis is a reporter and former photojournalist.